Kids need dads, and we can always find proof in some of the essays written for our annual Father of the Year Essay Contest. In the midst of the all happy sentiments we receive, these essays are reminders that many kids out there don’t have a father in their lives. The essays they send—about the importance of fathers—bring a whole different set of emotions.
This first one is from a young lady in the 11th grade:

My father left when I was two, and I haven’t seen him since. I don’t know what it is to have a father. I see people who have one and I wish I had mine. I’ve always wanted to feel the love of a father. Sometimes my days are bad and I cry because I need someone there to talk to, to share my troubles, my fears, and most of all my dreams. I’ve been through a lot of bad moments and if he would have been there none of this would have happened, because he could have been there to protect me. I feel empty inside.

And here’s one from a young man—a sixth grader:

I don’t have a dad, but I want one. If I had a dad I would feel like the luckiest kid in the whole wide world. A dad could help you build model airplanes or help you make a dog house. He would give you hope for challenges in your life, and if you’re lucky, he will give you help on your homework. It’s just too bad that I don’t have a dad.

Courageous words from hurting kids!
Now, this isn’t to bring you down or to ruin your day, but we must not forget that there are still millions of children in our nation longing for the love of a father. If you’ve spent any time acting as a father figure to children like these, then you especially deserve to be honored at Father’s Day. It’s a good reminder to all of us to reach out to kids who need a father they can count on.
 
 
 
 

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